2 entries from the month of: March 2017

Let’s Knit Together, Shall We?

March 13th

 

Seattle SweaterMy friend Rachele recently completed watching Gilmore Girls and would occasionally text me, “OMG. Paris is the best!” or “OMG, I love Emily!” Or “Why do Lorelai and Rory consistently make the worst decisions possible?” #maxmedina #thedeanrendevous

Yes.

Just, yes.

Seattle Sweater

And then came the text, “Um, Paris’ scarf is amazing and I totally want to knit it!”

Paris and Rory’s scarves are amazing. They are also double knit and way too much scarf for Phoenix at anytime of year, much less so this week when we are going to be in the 90s. I told Rachele I’d read something online about a GG scarf knit-a-long, with yarn kits and the patterns, and we could host our own. And then I took a closer look at the pattern and thought, “I’m never going to be able to wear that. It is going to take me a year to knit. And it is not going to be inexpensive. Hey! I know, maybe I should knit that Purl Soho dovetail scarf I’ve wanted to make forever instead.”

Seattle Sweater

And that, friends, is how we came upon the Spring Knit-a-long (SKAL). Here are the rules:

  1. The first rule of the SKAL is you do not talk about the SKAL. (Just kidding. Tell anyone you want, especially those who love to knit.)
  2. Pick a scarf you want to knit.
  3. Knit it.
  4. Send me a photo of your project in the works, or completed, and ideally: you wearing the end result!

There is no timeline, no pattern and no need to stress. This is an open invitation to knit something pretty for your neck and show it off. That’s it. I think Rachele may just bite the bullet, learn to double knit, and make the Paris scarf — which she could rock in Colorado.

I bought a soft merino yarn in a buttery yellow and another skein in a royal purple. I hope to get started this weekend. I’ll share my progress here, and on Instagram.

Knit on, friends!

K

Posted in
Knit
Comments (4)

Oh, Lola.

March 1st

Mexico City trip

Dolores Olmedo made her fortunes through importing tobacco into Mexico City, or so I was told when we recently visited her eponymous museum in the southern neighborhood of Xochimilco. She also married an American publisher, Mr. Phillips, who was very wealthy, and had four children. The Olmedo Museum was one of the prettiest places we toured. You enter through a set of heavy carved wood doors into a quiet, shaded courtyard that seems like an oasis from the noise, fumes and parade of people just outside the stone walls.

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

The grounds are massive. There are a series of small stone buildings surrounded by lush green lawns, tropical succulents and towering trees. To make the sight seem more magical, there is both a family of Indian peacocks strutting on one side of the property flaunting their iridescent plumage and six Xoloitzcuintli — Mexican hairless dogs. These pups were so sweet, and we were told they are vegetarian. (And were once delicacies to the Aztecs.) There are also ducks, geese and a gaggle of caretakers running around the grounds taking care of all the animals.

 

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Now that we’ve got all the good out of the way — let me cut to the chase. It is alleged Dolores, or Lola as her friends called her, was one of Diego’s many side pieces. So, of course, in true telenovela fashion, she and Frida hated each other. At age 94, Dolores was still telling the press how inconsequential Frida’s work was in comparison to her husband’s. (A matter of opinion, and one I do not share.)

Mexico City trip

Putting the gossip aside, what we do know is that Diego entrusted both his collection of works and Frida’s AND the Casa Azul in Lola’s care when he died of cancer in 1957. What we also know is that the Casa Azul, where Frida was born in 1907 and lived until her death in 1954, was in financial and literal ruins until Lola died in 2002. Afterward, others got involved and turned the Casa Azul into the great museum it is today. To her credit, Lola left her home, art and money to also become a museum, featuring the largest collection of Diego and Frida’s work.

Mexico City trip

As a super Frida fan, it pleased me that her collection is currently on loan and not at good old Lola’s house. But Diego’s work was there, and darn it if that scoundrel didn’t know how to paint. The collection is impressive. I prefer his murals, but seeing his smaller works showcased how he grew and developed as an artist with time. Also, there are other artists on display who studied under Diego. Finally, there was a collection of Mexican folk art by state that I absolutely loved. It was worth the one-hour cab ride from Coyoacan alone.

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City trip

Mexico City travel tip of the day: if you visit, make the time to go see the Olmedo Museum. Xochimilco is also home to the ancient canal system and floating gardens.

Posted in
Travel
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