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Nelson Mandela Fellowship dinner

This weekend, we hosted a handful of women from Africa for dinner. They are here studying with the Nelson Mandela fellowship at ASU for the summer. Hawanatu is a doctor from Sierra Leone. Sia is an accountant, also from Sierra Leone. Theresa works in human rights in Ghana. Tsige is a civil engineer from Ethiopia. They were learning as much about each other, and the 30-plus others in their group, as they were about America.

Nelson Mandela Scholar Dinners

I am thankful to have sat with them and listened as they talked about their country’s university systems, healthcare and what they expect as they return. I wish the program worked in reverse and I could go for six weeks to learn from them!

~K

Disappearing 9

Quilting

A dear friend of mine is organizing a summer quilt block challenge; she and others will put together the “disappearing 9 patch” squares into quilts and they will be sold for charity.

I took one look at this square and said it was outside of my ability. And frankly, the square above is far from perfect, but I am really happy I made myself try to do it. This tutorial is excellent.

Here is where my quilting is lacking: precision. I have such a hard time getting my pieces exactly the same and sewn with exactly the same seam allowance. Coincidentally, do you know what makes a beautifully crafted quilt? Precision. I’m not giving up. Later this Fall, Blair will be hosting a series of online quilting classes for folks like me — those who want to improve their skills but cannot sign up for one more in-person, drive-across-town commitment. Here is to hoping it helps strengthen my skills.

(I write this while cuddled under a new quilt my mom just sent this week. It is stunning and so far outside of my skill set. WHY can’t these sorts of skills be genetic?)

~K

Who doesn’t need a wool hood during the summer?

Cowl hood for Finny

 

When I recently visited Finny, she said she’d like to have a hood she could wear under sweatshirts when it was rainy or cold. We looked for a pattern and a color of yarn she liked. And within a couple days, this simple project was done.

Cowl hood for Finny

While this makes no sense for a Phoenician, I am considering knitting a few more of these for family and friends in Colorado. I can see how this would be super cute under a pea coat, or pulled down like a chunky cowl.

What’s on your needles?

~K

 

Master of Take Out

Inspired by Master of None, I borrowed a friend’s Kitchenaid pasta maker attachment the other day with the high hopes of making J ravioli. Several hours later, we ordered takeout.

The process:

Homemade pasta -- ravioli flop

Homemade pasta -- ravioli flop

Homemade pasta -- ravioli flop

Homemade pasta -- ravioli flop

Homemade pasta -- ravioli flop

Homemade pasta -- ravioli flop

 

The sauce was great. My trick is to use ground beef and ground pork, and to cook it all day with diced vegetables and a large handful of basil from the garden.

The pasta was under cooked and gross. The ravioli weren’t pinched tightly enough, so a lot of the filling escaped, and I didn’t roll the dough thin enough. Sadly, I am not the master of homemade pasta.

Yet.

~K

 

One Way Tee

IMG_3452

One way tee

One way tee

When I saw the One Way tee on the cover of Interweave Knits, I knew I wanted to try it. I’d never knit lace before, and this is the perfect blouse to wear over a long-sleeve t-shirt in the depths of a Phoenician winter.

Logically, I finished this project in June. It took about a month to knit in Madeline Tosh Shire.

Notes:

  1. Madeline Tosh yarn is gorgeous, but doesn’t come in dye lots. The next time I use this yarn, I’ll buy it all at once to ensure the color scheme is close.
  2. Saddle shoulders with lace are a pain. So is knitting a sweater in pieces. I prefer knitting bottom to top, in the round. If I made this, or one like this, in the future, I’ll do the math to knit the body in one piece.
  3. Lace takes a lot of precision. This is not a project I could do while watching Netflix.

 

Next up: Big Cozy knit scarf