Shameel! Shamazel! Hoffenpepper, incorporated!

September 29th

I volunteered recently with my food banking buddies at a local LDS cannery that donates to pantries. We were among some 60 volunteers to work on peach canning. If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to work in a cannery, this may come to mind.

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

If you’ve ever wondered what you sing in your head the entire time you are volunteering with peaches, the correct answer is this. In other news, this is how peaches go from tree to can. In fact, I was the “man who put them in the can in the factory downtown. So eat peaches everyday.”

Canning Day for Metro CareRing1. Suit up with other volunteers to watch silly safety video.

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

2. Hope you get assigned to a cool job.

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

3. Smile even when you don’t get to play with the food, thankful this isn’t your day job.

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

4. Take lots of photo breaks, claiming you are “union.”

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

Canning Day for Metro CareRing

5. Spend a lot of time thinking about John Steinbeck’s “Cannery Row” and the characters who canned fish in “Snow Falling on Cedars.” Realize you’ve read way more about manual labor than you’ve ever experienced. Rejoice. Go home, bake a pie, be thankful you have both food and a cushy job.

~K

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4 Responses

  1. What a cool experience though. Sort of puts *some days* in perspective!

  2. Thank you for sharing that experience. It makes me appreciate my two jobs for what they are but also it makes me appreciate the folks who do all those other jobs that are out there.

  3. Fabulous post. Now I know.

  4. I worked in a factory that packed stuff for waterbeds when I was 16. That was such an eye opener! Hard, thankless work. Not to mention fighting for a rubber mat to stand on.

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