The Poetic Theologian In a Car..

January 25th

Sagrado Corazon Church, Granada

Funny thing, this poetry and theology class is kicking. my. ass. These poets were hard core in their theology and making even the smartest in the room scratch his head for interpretation.

WH Auden, in particular, is a trickster. (Also, some of his poems are 50 pages long, with 60 pages afterword of “notes.” While cryptic, the dude had a LOT to say.) While my favorite poets remain lyricists, I have been getting a lot out of trying to decode this religious poetry and how it means something different to each person in the room.

Kinda like faith.

St. Francis of Assisi church

This week a friend sent me a message on Facebook asking why I’d chosen to be a member of the United Methodist Church. This time the answers came easily:

So, I have a random question for you…I noticed a bit ago that you said in a status update that you found a church you love and I think you said it was United Methodist. I was just wondering why you love the United Methodist church? Since we also have moved I’ve been trying to find a place where I feel good about going – a place that theology I am not always battling – and a few people have told me that I probably would like the United Methodist church. Anyway, I was thinking about going, but just wanted to ask your thoughts. Thanks so much!!

I fired back:

I have attended the UMC since baptism, so it wasn’t hard for me to buy into finding a church in this denomination when I came to Denver. For me, it is critical that my faith is all-loving. I believe in a God who loves homosexuals equally to heterosexuals, Republicans and Democrats alike, women and men exactly the same. With this in mind, it is also critical to me that God and my faith follow the teachings of Jesus and the Gospel. A reconciling UMC does all of these things. Right now the official slogan of the UMC is “Open hearts. Open minds. Open Doors.” In other words, our church is calling us to reach out to everyone and make every single soul feel welcome and loved in our worship. 

This is who I want to be. So, this church jives for me.

The Cathedral of Jinotega from the view of the cemetery

With next week being the final poetry class, I’ve decided to give the instructor a tongue-in-cheek card to thank him for his leadership and time. It will go a bit like this:

Dear Mr. Poetry Dean,

I really should call you Mr. Mean.

Auden, Stevens and more.

Difficult to the core!

All that said, I thank you for your patience and time.

You listened to me ramble without measure or rhyme.

I learned much from your love of words, faith and art.

I always hated poetry, but now have a fresh start.

Dylan and Seuss remain my favorite poets,

(I am not one, if you didn’t know it.)

 

~K

 

 

 

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3 Responses

  1. I skipped past your post (I’ll re-read later) because my heart jumped when I saw the church at the end of Gringo Street in Granada. We ran or biked past that church so many times. Thanks for the reminder. 🙂

  2. Amen, Sister. As a fellow UMCer (well, FUMCer, I’m still unclear as to the difference…), I feel the same way. The all encompassing, the all enveloping, the openness. I love it!

  3. Did you hear this today? It made me think of you and then I read your post on poetry. Fitting.
    http://www.npr.org/2012/01/27/145985904/newspoet-tracy-k-smith-writes-the-day-in-verse

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